Something I’ve found useful when converting old family favourites to new updated Gluten Free recipes, is the Equivalent Measurements and General Cooking/Baking Terms. I’ve include those charts here.

~Laureen

What the abbreviations in recipes mean

c = cup
t = tsp = teaspoon
T = Tbsp = tablespoon
C = Celsius
F = Fahrenheit
ml = militers
pt = pint
L = litre
g = gr = gram
oz = ounce
lb = pound
kg = kilogram

Measurement Equivalents for Cooking Conversions

Capacity:
1/4 teaspoon = 1 ml
1 tablespoon = 15 ml = 3 teaspoons
2 tablespoons = 30 ml = 1/8 cup
1/4 cup = 50 ml = 4 tablespoons
1/3 cup = 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon = 75 ml
1 cup = 16 tablespoons = 250 ml = 8 ounces
1 pint = 2 cups = 500 ml (1/2 liter) = 16 ounces
1 quart (2 pints) = 4 cups = 1 liter = 32 ounces

Weight:
1/16 pound = 30 grams = 1 ounce
1/4 pound = 115 grams = 4 ounces
1/2 pound = 225 grams = 8 ounces
1 pound = 455 grams = 16 ounces
2.2 pounds = 1 kilogram = 35 ounces

Pound, cups, tablespoon and teaspoon conversions assume the base weight-volume of water: 
1 pound = 2 cups
1 ounce = 2 tablespoons
1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons = 0.5 oz = 15 grams
1 teaspoon = 0.17 oz = 5 grams

Weight-volume of: 
Wheat Flour: 1 pound = 3 1/2 cups
Refined Sugar: 1 pound = 2 1/4 cups

Temperature Conversions

Fahrenheit  ===>  Celsius
250 degrees = 120 degrees
275 degrees = 140 degrees
300 degrees = 150 degrees
325 degrees = 160 degrees
350 degrees = 180 degrees
375 degrees = 190 degrees
400 degrees = 200 degrees
425 degrees = 220 degrees
450 degrees = 230 degrees
475 degrees = 240 degrees
500 degrees = 260 degrees

General Cooking and Baking Terms used in recipes

Dash or Pinch – Generally considered less than 1/8 teaspoon.
Firmly Packed – With a spatula, a spoon or your hand, tightly press the ingredient into the measuring cup. You should measure as much of the ingredient as you can fit into the measure.
Lightly Packed – Press the ingredient into the measuring cup lightly. Make sure there are no air pockets, but do not compress it too much either.
Even / Level – Measure the amount precisely, discarding the entire ingredient that rises above the rim of the measuring cup. The back of a straight knife works well for this.
Rounded – Do not flatten out the ingredient to the top of the measuring cup. Instead allow it to pile up above the rim naturally, into a soft, rounded shape.
Heaping / Heaped – Pile as much of the ingredient on top of the measure as it can hold.
Sifted – Sift with a strainer or sifter before measuring to make sure ingredient is not compacted and there is no other foreign substance in it.